Work starts on Grassdale’s $35m feedlot, fertiliser plant and power station expansion

WORK has commenced on the first-stage of a $35 million project that will deliver a three-pronged expansion at Mort & Co’s Grassdale Feedlot near Dalby on Queensland’s Darling Downs. The project includes the expansion of the feedlot from 48,000 to 70,000 SCUs (Standard Cattle Units); the first stage construction of a plant to convert composted manure into granulated fertiliser, and the development of a fired electricity generation plant The feedlot expansion is scheduled to begin in the next month, while the granulation plant is nearing final design and should be under construction within six months. During a recent Country Cabinet meeting in Toowoomba Queensland Minister for State Development, Manufacturing, Infrastructure and Planning, Cameron Dick, announced the project would receive a funding injection from the Queensland Government’s $150 million Jobs and Regional Growth Fund. His office said the level of funding support involved was covered by commercial in confidence restrictions and could not be divulged. However the Minister said the $35 million expansion represented a significant job creation project and would provide an ongoing economic boost for the region’s premi...

Fertilizing your new spring garden? Your help is needed to reduce phosphorus in Birmingham waterways. 2 things you can do now

Instead of spending $20-30 million on wastewater plant upgrades, Jefferson County is hoping you’ll help contain the last 1% of phosphorus in local waterways by not putting a certain type of fertilizer on your yard this spring. Why should you care and what can you do? Bham Now explains. Phosphorus is a mineral humans need in order to function. We have it in our bodies. While it is an important mineral needed to sustain all life, too much can also be a bad thing for our bodies and in the environment.   Excess nutrients like phosphorus in our waterways mean there are extra nutrients for algae blooms to thrive. Algae blooms consume oxygen and kill fish, which in turn throws off the whole ecosystem. So why is Jefferson County having to deal with phosphorus in the water? Jefferson County has spent over $100 million to remove phosphorus through its processes, but they also need help keeping it from running off our lawns. Phosphorus is found in fertilizers. When it rains, the fertilizer runoff goes down the nearest storm drain, which then travels to our lakes and rivers. This is something the EPA is trying to combat. By 2025, Jefferson County is expected to meet the new environmental p...