A scrapbook captures the candid, everyday intimacy of its subjects in a way that the stiff, formal atmosphere of studio portraiture struggles to replicate. Yet this “vernacular” art form has long been dismissed in favor of professional photography. Still, in recent years, an emerging critical reappraisal of vernacular photography has finally started to frame the work in a more nuanced light—and now, an ongoing exhibition at the Walther Collection Project Space in New York is further contributing to that dialogue. As Scott Reyburn reports for The New York Times, Scrapbook Love Story: Memory and the Vernacular Photo Album features more than 20 volumes filled with quotidian images, scribbled notes and miscellaneous ephemera from amateur photo albums and scrapbooks dating from the 1890s to the 1970s. All are drawn from gallery owner Artur Walther’s collection of more than 20,000 vernacular snapshots. The Walther Collection has long been invested in the renaissance of vernacular photographs, and it even co-sponsored a symposium on the subject last fall. For the new show, items on display were all selected to reflect the “visual and material equivalent of oral histories,” a pres...